Can I do a Castor Oil Pack without the pack / compress?

Can I do a Castor Oil Pack without the pack / compress?

Can I do a Queen of the Thrones Castor Oil Pack without the pack compress

Can I do a Castor Oil Pack without the pack / compress?

Written by: Heather Tanti RPN (non-practicing)
Medically reviewed by: Marisol Teijeiro N.D. (inactive) & Melanie Swackhammer B.A.

Est. reading time: 10 minutes.

So, you’ve heard of Castor Oil Packs because you’ve been prescribed them from your Naturopathic Doctor, Functional Medicine Practitioner, or maybe you’ve heard about them from your favorite natural health influencer, right?

You love the idea of them because of all the amazing benefits, like…

  • Improved bowel movements1and better absorption2
  • Reduced core inflammation3
  • Liver detox4 and microbiome gut health5-6-7-8
  • Enhanced relaxation and better sleep9-10-11-12

While an interesting protocol, seed cycling for hormone imbalance requires the patient to ingest seeds like flax, pumpkin, sesame and sunflower on specific weeks of their cycle.

BUT you can’t help but think to yourself… “Do I need the compress for Castor Oil Packs?”

The doctor dresses the wound and the nature heals it by Queen of the Thrones

“Why can’t I just rub Castor Oil on my stomach, throw an old t-shirt on, and call it a day?”

Call it a pack, a compress, or a wrap, either way, if you want the benefit of the Queen of the Thrones® Castor Oil Pack for Liver Kit or Castor Oil Pack for Fertility, you need it to get the job done properly.

Sounds like I’m trying to sell you something, agreed? Well, you are right, essentially.

I’m selling you on the benefits of this ancient health practice, and doing it the right way as it was intended, thankfully now with some easy tools created by a Naturopathic Doctor, for herself, her patients and her practice, to help her patients comply and get the results they were looking for.

You see, with the nightly repetition of your Castor Oil Pack, the oil is only 50% of the treatment effect, the main purpose isn’t necessarily the oil, although most people think that it is.

Queen of the Thrones Castor Oil Packs reduce inflammation from the outside in

The oil is supportive to reduce inflammation from the outside in, but what supports the body most is actually the use of the compress with the health-promoting action of CASTOR OIL.

Together, castor oil and the compress, pack or wrap, as people call it, have been used for centuries, and has since established its place in medicine.

But, like everything…

A Castor Oil Pack treatment must be done the right way, using the right tools.

It’s become a habit to skip a step, and to simply rub or roll on the Castor Oil over the liver, belly or pelvic region, or wherever else you may use the pack. Although this does provide benefit, we are missing the effect from the compress. Think of it like one large physiological bandage for your liver, pelvic region or belly.

The effect of a bandage is to draw the attention of the nervous system, by stimulation of the skin receptors, c-tactile receptors as well as others. This nervous system stimulation through the skin, actually acts as an escape button, to shift the body into the parasympathetic relaxed state,13-14-15-16 activating the Vagus nerve.

 

In addition, the pack keeps in heat, which, based on the principle of hydrotherapy, supports circulation and increases blood flow. With this comes nutrients and healing factors.

Plus, the pressure of the pack supports deeper permeation of the oil, which already is able to permeate the dermis, unlike other oils, so true activity can be realized.

Loving what you’re reading?

When Castor Oil is simply applied topically, without the pack, it’s as simple as a skin emollient.

This is why one cannot do what has been called the ‘ lazy mans’ Castor Oil Pack’, which is the practice of just applying oil to your skin and skipping the compress altogether.

You might be wondering, why does the compress matter this much?

Well, worn nightly as a compress, your Queen of the Thrones ® Castor Oil Pack has parasympathetic promoting effects, according to dermatological scientific research on neuro reaction to material softness and oil sensations on skin.17-18

In turn, this supports a shift into the parasympathetic nervous system, rest, digest and detox state, which is key to improving hormone imbalances and gut health. Sounds amazing, agreed?

Queen of the Thrones Castor Oil Pack help you to rest digest and detox

Applying Castor Oil topically to your skin with your Castor Oil Pack compress, allows it to work from the outside IN.

But how does your Castor Oil Pack practice do this?

You see, Castor Oil is known as a carrier oil, meaning, due to its molecular weight of ricinoleic acid19 (the major triglyceride chain making up approximately 90% of Castor Oil), it is effective topically, and only requires a minimal daily dosage.

It takes less than 2 tablespoons of Castor Oil placed on the pack at night, and much stays on the flannel, making it much less messy, and more convenient than traditional Castor Oil treatments. Amazing, agreed?

Repetitive nightly practice is like the training of the olympian athlete. Stay with me here.

The more you repeat it, the more your body can naturally bring on the relaxed state and shift from the sympathetic stressed state of hormonal imbalance, leaky gut and metabolic syndrome, to a calm, balanced parasympathetic state, all due to nightly application.

In chronobiology medicine, this is known as entrainement.20-21

Our bodies are entrained by 2 factors:

  1. An internal genetic body clock
  2. An external zeitgeber
Queen of the Thrones Castor Oil Pack naturally bring on your body to a relaxed state

What we are not too busy to do is easily place a Queen of the Thrones® Castor Oil Pack on the liver or pelvic region, before bed.

You, my friend, for your patients, clients or yourself can achieve this with practice, repetition and habit creation!

Are you a practitioner, health coach or wellness influencer? If you’re interested in recommending our easy-to-use tools and practically applying them in your health and wellness professional practice, in clinic, or online with the people you serve, you can join now!

Click here for references

1. Holm T, Brøgger-Jensen MR, Johnson L, Kessel L.Glutathione preservation during storage of rat lenses in opti-sol-GS and castor oil. PLoS One. 2013 Nov 19;8(11):e79620. Doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0079620. eCollection 2013. PMID: 24260265

2. Boddu SH1, Alsaab H2, Umar S3, Bonam SP2, Gupta H2, Ahmed S3. Anti-inflammatory effects of a novel ricinoleic acid poloxamer gel system for transdermal delivery. Int J Pharm. 2015 Feb 1;479(1):207-11. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpharm.2014.12.051. Epub 2014 Dec 24.

3. Vieira C et al. .Effect of ricinoleic acid in acute and subchronic experimental models of inflammation. Mediators Inflamm. 2000;9(5):223-8 PMID: 11200362.

4. Holm T, Brøgger-Jensen MR, Johnson L, Kessel L.Glutathione preservation during storage of rat lenses in opti-sol-GS and castor oil. PLoS One. 2013 Nov 19;8(11):e79620. Doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0079620. eCollection 2013. PMID: 24260265.

5. Andrade IM1, Andrade KM2, Pisani MX1, Silva-Lovato CH1, de Souza RF1, Paranhos Hde F1.Trial of an experimental castor oil solution for cleaning dentures. Braz Dent J. 2014 Jan-Feb;25(1):43-7.PMID: 24789291

6. Badaró MM, Salles MM, Leite VMF, Arruda CNF, Oliveira VC, Nascimento CD, Souza RF, Paranhos HFO, Silva-Lovato CH. Clinical trial for evaluation of Ricinus communis and sodium hypochlorite as denture cleanser.J Appl Oral Sci. 2017 May-Jun; 25(3):324-334. PMID: 28678952

7. Salles MM, Badaró MM, Arruda CN, Leite VM, Silva CH, Watanabe E, Oliveira Vde C, Paranhos Hde F. Antimicrobial activity of complete denture cleanser solutions based on sodium hypochlorite and Ricinus communis – a randomized clinical study.J Appl Oral Sci. 2015 Nov-Dec; 23(6):637-42. PMID: 26814466.

8. Marcela Moreira Salles, Maurício Malheiros Badaró, Carolina Noronha Ferraz de Arruda, Vanessa Maria Fagundes Leite, Cláudia Helena Lovato da Silva, Evandro Watanabe, Viviane de Cássia Oliveira, Helena de Freitas Oliveira Paranhos, Antimicrobial activity of complete denture cleanser solutions based on sodium hypochlorite and Ricinus communis – a randomized clinical study. Randomized Controlled Trial J Appl Oral Sci Nov-Dec 2015;23(6):637-42. doi:10.1590/1678-775720150204. PMID: 26814466.

9. Walker SC1, Trotter PD2, Swaney WT2, Marshall A3, Mcglone FP4. C-tactile afferents: Cutaneous mediators of oxytocin release during affiliative tactile interactions? Neuropeptides. 2017 Aug;64:27-38. doi: 10.1016/j.npep.2017.01.001. Epub 2017 Jan 19. PMID: 28162847.

10. Rolls ET et all. Representations of pleasant and painful touch in the human orbitofrontal and cingulate cortices. Cereb Cortex. 2003 Mar;13(3):308-17. PMID: 12571120.

11. Francis S, Rolls ET, Bowtell R, McGlone F, O’Doherty J, Browning A, Clare S, Smith E. The representation of pleasant touch in the brain and its relationship with taste and olfactory areas. Neuroreport. 1999 Feb 25;10(3):453-9. PMID: 10208571.

12. Löken LS, Wessberg J, Morrison I, McGlone F, Olausson H. Coding of pleasant touch by unmyelinated afferents in humans. Nat Neurosci. 2009 May;12(5):547-8. Epub 2009 Apr 12. PMID: 19363489.

13. Walker SC1, Trotter PD2, Swaney WT2, Marshall A3, Mcglone FP4. C-tactile afferents: Cutaneous mediators of oxytocin release during affiliative tactile interactions? Neuropeptides. 2017 Aug;64:27-38. doi: 10.1016/j.npep.2017.01.001. Epub 2017 Jan 19. PMID: 28162847 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28162847

14. Rolls ET et all. Representations of pleasant and painful touch in the human orbitofrontal and cingulate cortices. Cereb Cortex. 2003 Mar;13(3):308-17. PMID: 12571120 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12571120.

15. Francis S, Rolls ET, Bowtell R, McGlone F, O’Doherty J, Browning A, Clare S, Smith E. The representation of pleasant touch in the brain and its relationship with taste and olfactory areas. Neuroreport. 1999 Feb 25;10(3):453-9. PMID: 10208571 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10208571.

16. Löken LS, Wessberg J, Morrison I, McGlone F, Olausson H. Coding of pleasant touch by unmyelinated afferents in humans. Nat Neurosci. 2009 May;12(5):547-8. Epub 2009 Apr 12. PMID: 19363489 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19363489.

17. Francis S, Rolls ET, Bowtell R, McGlone F, O’Doherty J, Browning A, Clare S, Smith E. The representation of pleasant touch in the brain and its relationship with taste and olfactory areas. Neuroreport. 1999 Feb 25;10(3):453-9. PMID: 10208571 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10208571.

18. Löken LS, Wessberg J, Morrison I, McGlone F, Olausson H. Coding of pleasant touch by unmyelinated afferents in humans. Nat Neurosci. 2009 May;12(5):547-8. Epub 2009 Apr 12. PMID: 19363489 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19363489.

19. PubChem [Internet]. Bethesda (MD): National Library of Medicine (US), National Center for Biotechnology Information; 2004-. PubChem Compound Summary for CID 643684, Ricinoleic acid; [cited 2022 Mar. 31].

20. Golombek DA, Rosenstein RE. Physiology of circadian entrainment. Physiol Rev. 2010 Jul;90(3):1063-102. doi: 10.1152/physrev.00009.2009. PMID: 20664079.

21. Kronfeld-Schor N, Dominoni D, de la Iglesia H, Levy O, Herzog ED, Dayan T, Helfrich-Forster C. Chronobiology by moonlight. Proc Biol Sci. 2013 Jul 3;280(1765):20123088. doi: 10.1098/rspb.2012.3088. PMID: 23825199; PMCID: PMC3712431.

Disclaimer

Disclaimer: Any opinions, advice, statements, services, offers, information or content expressed or made available by third parties, including information providers, are those of the respective authors or distributors. Neither Queen of the Thrones® nor any third-party provider of information guarantees the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any content. This communication does not create a doctor-patient relationship. Information provided does not replace the advice of your health care practitioner. If you happen to purchase anything we promote, in this or any of our communications, it’s likely Queen of the Thrones® will receive some kind of affiliate compensation. Still, we only promote content and products that we truly believe in and share with our friends, family and patients. If you ever have a concern with anything we share, please let us know at care@queenofthethrones.com. We want to make sure we are always serving Our Queendom at the highest level.

Diastasis Recti and Constipation | Two Common Postpartum Body Challenges

Diastasis Recti and Constipation | Two Common Postpartum Body Challenges

Learn with Queen of the Thrones how Diastasis Recti and Constipation are Two Common Postpartum Body Challenges

Diastasis Recti and Constipation | Two Common Postpartum Body Challenges

Written by: Kim Vopni, The Vagina Coach.

Est. reading time: 9 minutes.

There are two things that I will never forget about the early hours after giving birth to my first son Diastasis Recti and Constipation.

I remember how disconnected my upper body felt from my lower body when I got up to go to the bathroom for the first time after my baby entered the world.  I felt like I had to hold myself together.

Queen of the Thrones® explains how constipation cause inflamed belly

There are two things that I will never forget about the early hours after giving birth to my first son Diastasis Recti and Constipation.

I remember how disconnected my upper body felt from my lower body when I got up to go to the bathroom for the first time after my baby entered the world.  I felt like I had to hold myself together.

What was a fairly tight compact part of my body, was now a vacant space with very little tone.  The muscles in my abdominal wall had stretched well beyond their normal, optimal length and the rectus muscles (think 6 pack) had also moved away from their midline position – a condition known as diastasis recti.  

As I sat down to pee, I had a sudden panic attack knowing that at some point I was also going to have to poop! 

The thought of that first bowel movement after giving birth is almost scarier than the birth itself! This fear coupled with other influences I will elaborate on below, can contribute to postpartum constipation.  

Diastasis Recti and constipation are very common and with the right information, can be very well managed and don’t have to be a big deal in the early postpartum period or beyond.  Let’s look first at constipation.

Postpartum Constipation

Once the baby is born, we as parents start to diligently record every feed and every poop our baby makes.  What no one really thinks about is that the new mom would benefit from having someone do the same for her. Nutrition is a key element of postpartum healing and can play a huge role in healing and nourishing the body as well as managing bowel movements therefore reducing the likelihood of constipation.Labour typically slows down the digestive system, especially if you had an epidural and it can take a few days to get back on track.  Other things that can influence the digestive system in the early weeks postpartum are pain medications, iron supplementation and fear of pooping.A lot happens in the pelvis and to the vagina, perineum and anus – things like tearing, stitches, tenderness and hemorrhoids.  The thought of anything else passing through can be a bit stressful to say the least. Stress activates the ‘fight or flight’ response which reduces blood flow to the digestive system and can contribute to constipation.From a Chinese medicine perspective the first system that needs to be addressed in postpartum healing is the digestive system.  The digestive system is responsible for transforming food into blood and energy and if digestion is off, then the body will not benefit from the food consumed and therefore not build the blood and energy needed for healing.

Mother Roasting

It is also believed in Chinese Medicine that the body has ‘opened’ during pregnancy and birth and is therefore susceptible to ‘wind’ or ‘cold’.  New mothers have a 30 day period of “sitting in” where the mother does not go out and is instead served warm soups, stews, and broths that are easy to digest.

Korea has a 100 day period where the mother and child do not leave the home. In Japan, the mother and baby stay at the mother’s parent’s home for some pampering and one-on-one time with the baby. India and African nations include traditions of 10-40 day isolations where additional support is provided including massage, childcare and food preparation.

Other practices from places like Malaysia include belly binding and hot stones on the abdomen to help cleanse it, close it and heal it.

These practices not only allow the body time to recover from the trauma of giving birth but provide a period of mental rest that I firmly believe creates a solid foundation for mom and baby from day one.

According with Queen of the Thrones® the digestive system gets stressed by constipation
Belly wrapping support the pelvis and abdominal wall

The belief of the need to ‘close’ the body is justified.  Diastasis Recti has been shown to happen to 100% of women in the third trimester and the gap between the muscles doesn’t always return to its pre-pregnancy state, nor does the connective tissue naturally regain its supportive tensioning role in the core. The muscles in the pelvic floor have also stretched and in some cases have been cut or torn which can contribute to challenges with core control and continence.

Belly wrapping or belly binding aims to provide temporary compression and support to the pelvis and abdominal wall in the early weeks postpartum when the muscles are temporarily hindered in their ability to contribute to core control.  

The muscles and connective tissue in the abdominal wall and pelvis are key with regards to stability and control in our inner core but so are the bones and joints. In the pelvis, the shape of the bones provides what is called ‘form closure’ while the muscles, ligaments and connective tissue contribute to what is called ‘force closure’. During pregnancy biomechanical changes occur in the body which can reduce the effectiveness of both form and force closure such as;

  • Altered posture and load bearing;
  • Altered muscle length in the pelvic floor and abdomen (both longer and shorter) which results in reduced ability for muscle force production;
  • The role of relaxing and progesterone contribute to joint laxity and when the ligaments are lax it affects the force closure.
  • The abdominal muscles are stretched to allow space for the enlarging uterus, which can lead to loss of muscle tone and strength in the abdominal region and a compromised ability to produce tension in the thoracolumbar fascia, resulting in reduced force closure in the pelvis;
  • Diastasis recti is a distortion in the abdominal wall and can impair the function of the muscles including their role in posture and pelvic stability;
  • The transversus abdominis, multifidus, diaphragm and the pelvic floor are all anticipatory muscles of the core and are required for force closure in the pelvis – all are affected by posture and alignment changes in pregnancy
  • Intra-abdominal pressure – altered mechanics and alignment mean management of intra-abdominal pressure will change

The benfits of Castor Oil include these three main functions:nutrient-rich, pain-relieving and anti-inflammatory.

Add a Fascia Massage Roller to these benefitsand you’ve now super boosted these functions.

You see, combining Castor Oil to your Fascia Massage Roller practice helps to massage the tight tissues and adhesions found along energetic pathways that can become blocked by physical or emotional trauma.

And the benefits of this practice are:

  • Breaking down of scar tissue from injury, cesarean section, surgery, and/or endometriosis
  • Fade stretch marks from weight gain or postpartum
  • Fascia release for sore muscles and tight IT bands
  • Lymphatic drainage and circulation
  • Support smoothing out cellulite

Sounds amazing, right?

Intra-Abdominal Pressure

We can’t talk about postpartum recovery and wrapping without talking about intra-abdominal pressure.

Intra-abdominal pressure is defined as the pressure within the abdominal cavity.  It is part of our core stability system.  We need some, but not too much and we need an ability to manage the varying pressures throughout the day. When we take a breath in, the diaphragm descends and there is a compression action on the abdominal contents which acts to stabilize the pelvis and spine.  We can have too much pressure such as a Valsalva maneuverer which is an inhale, then breath hold while bearing down.  This often results in a distended abdomen and can place pressure on the pelvic organs as well.

We can’t talk about postpartum recovery and wrapping without talking about intra-abdominal pressure.

Intra-abdominal pressure is defined as the pressure within the abdominal cavity.  It is part of our core stability system.  We need some, but not too much and we need an ability to manage the varying pressures throughout the day. When we take a breath in, the diaphragm descends and there is a compression action on the abdominal contents which acts to stabilize the pelvis and spine. 

We can have too much pressure such as a Valsalva maneuverer which is an inhale, then breath hold while bearing down.  This often results in a distended abdomen and can place pressure on the pelvic organs as well.

The reverse can also be seen in a technique called “hypopressives” which decreases intra-abdominal pressure and results in a hollowing or concavity of the abdomen.  A reliance on one may result in a compromised ability to manage changes in intra-abdominal pressure such as during lifting or exercise.

Crunches were given a bad rap because they cause an increase in intra-abdominal pressure but a study found that activities like standing up from a chair or downward dog pose in yoga actually created equal or greater increases in intra-abdominal pressure which suggests that managing intra-abdominal pressure is more about HOW a person performs a movement or exercise rather than the exercise itself.

Wrapping is often considered to be a practice that increases intra-abdominal pressure and it can when done incorrectly.  Wrapping is ideally done to temporarily contribute to force closure in the pelvis with some gentle hugging of the abdominal wall.

Many mistakenly wrap only the waist and wrap very tightly in hopes that it will help heal the gap between the abdominals (diastasis recti).  Instead it increases intra-abdominal pressure, it interferes with digestion and it restricts optimal breathing patterns which can prevent healing of the abdominal wall and pelvic floor and can also contribute to constipation.

My recommendations for postpartum recovery include principles that support rest and belly wrapping in the early weeks postpartum, core retraining with pelvic floor initiated movements, a balance between hyper and hypopressive exercise and nutrition that is based on the traditional practices of mother roasting to support optimal digestion.

Are you a practitioner, health coach or wellness influencer? If you’re interested in recommending our easy-to-use tools and practically applying them in your health and wellness professional practice in clinic or online with the people you serve or become a wholesale partner: 

Disclaimer

Disclaimer: Any opinions, advice, statements, services, offers, information or content expressed or made available by third parties, including information providers, are those of the respective authors or distributors. Neither Queen of the Thrones® nor any third-party provider of information guarantees the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any content. This communication does not create a doctor-patient relationship. Information provided does not replace the advice of your health care practitioner. If you happen to purchase anything we promote, in this or any of our communications, it’s likely Queen of the Thrones® will receive some kind of affiliate compensation. Still, we only promote content and products that we truly believe in and share with our friends, family and patients. If you ever have a concern with anything we share, please let us know at care@queenofthethrones.com. We want to make sure we are always serving Our Queendom at the highest level.