How Castor Oil Packs help with constipation from ozempic for weight loss

How Castor Oil Packs help with constipation from ozempic for weight loss

Queen of the Thrones Castor oil pack for constipation problems

How Castor Oil Packs help with constipation from ozempic for weight loss

Written by: Heather Tanti R.P.N (non-practicing)

Medically reviewed by: Victoria Williams R.H.N.

Est. reading time: 7 minutes

Beginning the road to weight loss can be a rollercoaster of emotions filled with highs and lows, agreed? And for those relying on the support of medications like Ozempic for weight loss, the journey can sometimes take an unexpected turn- cue the common, but frustrating side effect: constipation.

It’s more than just a physical discomfort; it’s a hurdle that stands in the way of your wellness goals.

So, let’s unravel the connection between Ozempic, weight loss, and the often overlooked self-care hero – Castor Oil Packs.

What is Ozempic used for?

Queen of the Thrones what is ozempic drug
Ozempic for weight loss is on the rise in popularity lately, and at times for quite controversial reasons. You see, in 2012, Novo Nordisk’s research team formulated Ozempic (also known as semaglutide), to create a diabetes treatment that would last longer than the one offered currently- liraglutide.1

Although Ozempic was designed to regulate blood sugar levels in type 2 diabetes, its rise to fame was unexpected. Ozempic’s side effect of rapid weight loss soon caught the public’s attention, turning it into a highly sought-after drug, especially for celebrities.

Ozempic for Diabetes

Originally, Ozempic was created as a once-weekly injection that helps lower blood sugar in type 2 diabetics by helping the pancreas make more insulin. 

This medication replicates the effects of a hormone called glucagon-like peptide-1, which our bodies naturally produce in our intestines. This hormone suppresses our appetite by signaling to our bodies that we feel full and slows down the rate at which our stomachs empty. 

As a result, individuals with obesity and related health issues have experienced weight loss with ozempic, as it helps them feel fuller faster.

Ozempic for weight loss

Although Ozempic is not primarily marketed as a weight-loss medication, research conducted by Novo Nordisk, the drug’s manufacturer, indicates that individuals who take semaglutide – the active ingredient in Ozempic – may experience weight loss.3

Although weight loss may not be the primary intended result of taking Ozempic, it can still be a significant advantage for individuals who are struggling with weight issues. It’s important to note though, that Ozempic should only be taken under the guidance of a healthcare professional. 

Additionally, incorporating lifestyle changes such as a healthy diet and regular exercise are essential components of any successful weight loss plan.

Possible side-effects of Ozempic for weight loss

Queen of the Thrones side effects of ozempic

With every new medication comes an array of potential side-effects, agreed? Are you guilty of tuning out on those long-winded drug commercials listing their side-effects? I know I am! Ozempic is no exception when it comes to potentially unpleasant side-effects as you’re about to see.

Ozempic and constipation

When taking a medication that slows your digestive system, such as certain appetite suppressants, your stomach will take longer to empty. This results in a feeling of fullness that lasts longer, but it may also lead to a slowdown in bowel movements, delayed gastric emptying, and difficulty passing stools.4 Yikes!
While Ozempic encourages the body to make more insulin (which is great for managing blood sugar levels), insulin also slows down how fast the gut moves, which means you poop less often!5

And because Ozempic makes you feel fuller longer, it may also mean you end up drinking less fluids during the day, which is a huge contributing factor to Ozempic constipation.

So keep those fluids up!

Ozempic and stomach pain

Some users of Ozempic have reported experiences with flu-like symptoms, including cramps and pain.6 And because this medication has been known to alter stomach acid secretion, it can disrupt the digestive system’s food movement, resulting in abdominal discomfort.

At times, abdominal pain can be a result of gastroparesis (a condition characterized by delayed stomach emptying), which can be caused by medications such as Ozempic.7 While this delay can have some encouraging effects, such as suppressing hunger and aiding weight loss efforts, it can also result in stomach discomfort.

Ozempic Face

Have you heard of ‘Ozempic face’? This is a trending topic lately as a side-effect to this medication, leaving some users of Ozempic to experience sagging and aging of facial skin.

Doctors who prescribe Ozempic often don’t talk to patients about its possible effects on the face. It’s common for users to turn to plastic surgery for help with these changes, but it can be difficult for surgeons to handle facial changes caused by quick weight loss. 

Procedures like dermal fillers, skin tightening, and surgery are often used to help restore facial volume and excess skin.8

Queen of the Thrones how ozempic affects the face

Therefore, addressing the potential impact of Ozempic on facial changes is so important, and ensuring open communication between healthcare providers and Ozempic users about this side-effect can help individuals on their weight loss journey to be more aware.

Ozempic risks

Risks associated-with the use of Ozempic by Queen of the Thrones

Allergic reactions

It is important to pay close attention to any possible signs of an allergic reaction when starting a new medication. 

These symptoms may include:

  • Redness, swelling, rash, and itching at the injection site
  • Rash, itching, or hives on the skin
  • Shortness of breath
  • Wheezing or difficulty breathing
  • Swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or other parts of the body9.

 

Additionally, it is important to inform your healthcare provider of any allergies you have before starting a new medication. This will help them determine the best course of treatment for you and minimize the risk of an allergic reaction! 

Now, let’s shift our gaze to the potential link between diabetic retinopathy and Ozempic.

Diabetic retinopathy

Are you familiar with diabetic retinopathy? This is a condition that affects the eyes and is primarily seen in people with diabetes. 

Now, you might be wondering “How does Ozempic fit into this?”

Some studies suggest a potential link between Ozempic and an increased risk of diabetic retinopathy. Patients who were treated with Ozempic and had poorly controlled blood glucose over a prolonged period, often experienced a higher number of events related to diabetic retinopathy complications.10

 

Queen of the Thrones explains how diabetic retinopathy is caused

It is important to note that the link between Ozempic and diabetic retinopathy is not fully understood, and more research is needed to establish a clear causation. However, if you are taking Ozempic and notice any changes in your vision, or experience any symptoms related to diabetic retinopathy, it is important to seek medical attention.

Hypoglycemia

What exactly is hypoglycemia? 

Hypoglycemia refers to ‘low blood sugar’, a common occurrence in diabetics that can be dangerous. 

Think of it as a rollercoaster- sudden dips that can leave you feeling shaky, dizzy, sweaty, and downright uncomfortable.11

While Ozempic aims to help manage blood sugar levels, we’re all biochemically unique and for some people it may contribute to hypoglycemia. 

So, how do you learn to spot the signs and take action if you’re experiencing low blood sugar? Awareness is key. Keeping a close eye on your glucose levels, and having snacks on hand in those moments is important.

*Note that any unusual or uncomfortable side-effects/symptoms should always be reported to your healthcare provider.*

Increased risk of thyroid cancer

One Ozempic risk that has sparked conversation is the potential association with increased thyroid cancer risk.12 

While the relationship between Ozempic and thyroid cancer isn’t completely clear, some studies have hinted at an increased risk.

So, should this raise alarm bells? Not necessarily.

However, it’s important to note that the overall risk of developing thyroid cancer is still relatively low. Understanding that every medication comes with potential risks allows us to make informed choices about what may be best for our unique needs.

In the meantime, the Queen of the Thrones® Thyroid Castor Oil Pack makes an excellent self-care companion, giving your thyroid natural TLC.

Thyroid Pack applied to the neck by Queen of the Thrones

Pancreatitis

Believe it or not, pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), is a risk associated with Ozempic use. Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a serious medical condition that results from inflammation of the pancreas, which produces digestive enzymes and hormones that regulate blood sugar levels13, making it a vital organ your body relies on.

Awareness is key, and knowing the signs to watch for- such as abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting- will help you to be proactive in your wellness while on Ozempic.

Malnutrition from Ozempic for weight loss

While Ozempic is designed to help with weight loss and type 2 diabetes management, there is a possibility that it may contribute to malnutrition.14  

Why is that? Well, the mechanism behind this lies in Ozempic’s ability to suppress appetite, which leads to decreased food intake.

So, how exactly do you navigate this nutritional crossroad? Firstly, it’s crucial to listen to your body. 

Pay attention to hunger cues, and ensure you’re giving your body the fuel it needs to thrive with a nutritious diet that includes hearty proteins, healthy fats, and heaps of vegetables.

While the goal may be the off-brand use of Ozempic for weight-loss, it shouldn’t come at the expense of the vital nutrients your body needs to function.

Losing extreme amounts of weight can be dangerous, so being aware of how you are feeling, and staying in communication with your healthcare provider will ensure you are receiving guidance and support while using Ozempic.

Castor Oil Packs for constipation

Queen of the Thrones how Castor oil packs help ozempic constipation

Let’s be honest; nobody enjoys constipation… Stomach bloating, cramping, sharp pains… Can you relate? 

Ozempic constipation can be supported with Castor Oil Packs– a natural ally that might just add a touch of comfort when you need it most.

So how exactly do these packs work their magic? 

Castor Oil Packs are a time-tested remedy known for their potential to support balanced inflammation15, colon cleansing16, less-stress17, and best of all- more regular bowel movements!

Plus, Castor Oil Packs can be used with any medication or supplement, bringing you a reliable source of self-care you can feel good about. It often helps them work better!

Queen of the Thrones® heatless, less-mess Castor Oil Packs are your easy solution to this ancient practice that was once messy and complicated. 

Would you love to learn more about self-care with Castor Oil Packs? Check out this blog!

Keep reading to discover just how easy it is to get started with a Castor Oil Liver Pack for Ozempic constipation support and overall wellness.

How to use your Liver Castor Oil Pack

One of the best things about Queen of the Thrones® Castor Oil Packs is how easy they are to use. There’s no big list of steps needed to get started with your self-care, making it a fan-favorite for wellness made simple.

Check it out for yourself!

How to use Queen of the Thrones Castor oil pack

It gets even better my friend. You see, we didn’t just stop at the Castor Oil Pack for your liver, we took self-care further, encompassing a whole body approach to holistic wellness with:

Don’t you just love Mother Nature’s ability to bring you natural wellness solutions? 

So, if you’re navigating the ups and downs of Ozempic and its side effects, Castor Oil Packs are your go-to for simple, natural support for constipation, thyroid care, and hormone balance!

Conclusion

As we resurface from the world of Ozempic side effects, remember that your well-being is important and valued. And just like a well-prepared adventurer equips themselves with tools for the road, you’re now armed with insights into how Castor Oil Packs can help bring you comfort while navigating Ozempic constipation.

It’s important to note that while Castor Oil Packs can be a helpful addition to your constipation, they should not be used as a replacement for medical advice or guidance. As always, consult with your healthcare provider before trying any new remedies or practices. 

Taking care of your wellness is a journey, and with the right resources, you can navigate it successfully!

Are you a practitioner, health coach or wellness influencer? If you’re interested in recommending our easy-to-use tools and practically applying them in your health and wellness professional practice, in clinic, or online with the people you serve, you can join now!

Click here for references
  1. Dhillon S. Semaglutide: First Global Approval. Drugs. 2018 Feb;78(2):275-284. doi: 10.1007/s40265-018-0871-0. PMID: 29363040. 
  1. Ard J, Fitch A, Fruh S, Herman L. Weight Loss and Maintenance Related to the Mechanism of Action of Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Receptor Agonists. Adv Ther. 2021 Jun;38(6):2821-2839. doi: 10.1007/s12325-021-01710-0. Epub 2021 May 11. PMID: 33977495; PMCID: PMC8189979.
  1. Chao AM, Tronieri JS, Amaro A, Wadden TA. Semaglutide for the treatment of obesity. Trends Cardiovasc Med. 2023 Apr;33(3):159-166. doi: 10.1016/j.tcm.2021.12.008. Epub 2021 Dec 21. PMID: 34942372; PMCID: PMC9209591.
  1. Shah M, Vella A. Effects of GLP-1 on appetite and weight. Rev Endocr Metab Disord. 2014 Sep;15(3):181-7. doi: 10.1007/s11154-014-9289-5. PMID: 24811133; PMCID: PMC4119845.
  1. Stassen MP. La gastroparésie diabétique [Diabetic gastroparesis]. Rev Med Liege. 2005 May-Jun;60(5-6):509-15. French. PMID: 16035319.
  1. Filippatos TD, Panagiotopoulou TV, Elisaf MS. Adverse Effects of GLP-1 Receptor Agonists. Rev Diabet Stud. 2014 Fall-Winter;11(3-4):202-30. doi: 10.1900/RDS.2014.11.202. Epub 2015 Feb 10. PMID: 26177483; PMCID: PMC5397288.
  1. Krishnasamy S, Abell TL. Diabetic Gastroparesis: Principles and Current Trends in Management. Diabetes Ther. 2018 Jul;9(Suppl 1):1-42. doi: 10.1007/s13300-018-0454-9. Epub 2018 Jun 22. PMID: 29934758; PMCID: PMC6028327.
  1. Humphrey CD, Lawrence AC. Implications of Ozempic and Other Semaglutide Medications for Facial Plastic Surgeons. Facial Plast Surg. 2023 Dec;39(6):719-721. doi: 10.1055/a-2148-6321. Epub 2023 Aug 4. PMID: 37541662.
  1. Trujillo J. Safety and tolerability of once-weekly GLP-1 receptor agonists in type 2 diabetes. J Clin Pharm Ther. 2020 Sep;45 Suppl 1(Suppl 1):43-60. doi: 10.1111/jcpt.13225. PMID: 32910487; PMCID: PMC7540535.
  1. Coon SA, Crannage EF, Kerwin LC, Guyton JE. Semaglutide once-weekly: improved efficacy with a new safety warning. Expert Rev Clin Pharmacol. 2018 Nov;11(11):1061-1072. doi: 10.1080/17512433.2018.1534201. Epub 2018 Oct 16. PMID: 30296182.
  1. Cryer PE. Symptoms of hypoglycemia, thresholds for their occurrence, and hypoglycemia unawareness. Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am. 1999 Sep;28(3):495-500, v-vi. doi: 10.1016/s0889-8529(05)70084-0. PMID: 10500927.
  1. Bezin J, Gouverneur A, Pénichon M, Mathieu C, Garrel R, Hillaire-Buys D, Pariente A, Faillie JL. GLP-1 Receptor Agonists and the Risk of Thyroid Cancer. Diabetes Care. 2023 Feb 1;46(2):384-390. doi: 10.2337/dc22-1148. PMID: 36356111.
  1. Walkowska J, Zielinska N, Karauda P, Tubbs RS, Kurtys K, Olewnik Ł. The Pancreas and Known Factors of Acute Pancreatitis. J Clin Med. 2022 Sep 22;11(19):5565. doi: 10.3390/jcm11195565. PMID: 36233433; PMCID: PMC9571992.

     

  2. Ida S, Kaneko R, Imataka K, Okubo K, Shirakura Y, Azuma K, Fujiwara R, Murata K. Effects of Antidiabetic Drugs on Muscle Mass in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Curr Diabetes Rev. 2021;17(3):293-303. doi: 10.2174/1573399816666200705210006. PMID: 32628589.

     

  3. Vieira C et al. .Effect of ricinoleic acid in acute and subchronic experimental models of inflammation. Mediators Inflamm. 2000;9(5):223-8 PMID: 11200362

     

  4. Andrade IM1, Andrade KM2, Pisani MX1, Silva-Lovato CH1, de Souza RF1, Paranhos Hde F1.Trial of an experimental castor oil solution for cleaning dentures. Braz Dent J. 2014 Jan-Feb;25(1):43-7.PMID: 24789291

     

  5. Walker SC1, Trotter PD2, Swaney WT2, Marshall A3, Mcglone FP4. C-tactile afferents: Cutaneous mediators of oxytocin release during affiliative tactile interactions? Neuropeptides. 2017 Aug;64:27-38. doi: 10.1016/j.npep.2017.01.001. Epub 2017 Jan 19. PMID: 28162847

What Is A Pelvic Castor Oil Pack And Why Use It?

What Is A Pelvic Castor Oil Pack And Why Use It?

Queen of the Thrones Pelvic Pack Bundle for balanced hormones

What Is A Pelvic Castor Oil Pack And Why Use It?

Written by: Victoria Williams R.H.N. Christine Ruggeri Victoria Williams MD (Hom). Victoria is Head of Operations at Queen of the Thrones®. Victoria obtained a Pre-Health Science Certificate with Honours from Georgian College, which ignited her passion for natural wellness and nutrition. Full bio Est. reading time: 7 minutes.

Your Complete Guide On Castor Oil Packs for the Pelvis & Hips

In the depths of her being, women hold precious treasures – her ovaries, uterus and fallopian tubes. These delicate, yet mighty reproductive organs are responsible for releasing hormones that whisper softly to our bodies, guiding us through the mysterious monthly dance of our menstrual cycle.  For every woman, the pelvic area is a sacred and beautiful part of her being and hormonal health, a wonder of nature that gives rise to life, love and all the magic that lies within. Here you’ll find out how to use Queen of the Thrones® Castor Oil Packs for nourishing the delicate area of your hips, uterus, reproductive organs, and everything in between. The best part? Using a Pelvic Castor Oil Pack may help you support hormone balance naturally throughout your monthly cycle. Curious to know how?   

Can Castor Oil Packs support hormonal and reproductive health?

You dread your period because you know the inevitable cramps, back pain, and fatigue that makes you curl up in the fetal position are on their way, right? Worse than that, with hormonal fluctuations kicking in, you feel moody and disconnected from your body, making you (even more) stressed. Is this you? And if you’ve been diagnosed with endometriosis, PCOS, ovarian cysts, uterine fibroids, or other hormonal conditions, everything is amplified. Agreed? A nightly Pelvic Castor Oil Pack may help you support… 
Queen of the Thrones Pelvic Region Illnesses

1. Balanced hormonal health and less stress

You see, the soft compression of a Pelvic Castor Oil Pack and the feeling of oil on your skin helps calm your system and promotes the release of feel-good hormones, including:  
  • Dopamine1, 2, a hormone that makes you feel satisfied and helps connect your emotions with your nerve cells.
  • Oxytocin3, 4, often referred to as the “love and connection” hormone – it makes you feel all warm and fuzzy. You naturally get it from hugs, love, touch, gentle compression or bonding with a new balance.
Castor Oil Packs neurotransmitters by Queen of the Thrones
Plus, oxytocin has been shown to help lower cortisol (your stress hormone) and balance blood pressure5, leading to healthy levels of progesterone.  Why does this matter? Well, studies show a connection between higher anxiety levels and high progesterone levels6, and healthy levels of progesterone are key for maintaining balanced moods during your monthly menstrual cycle.  Castor Oil Packs may also support reproductive health, as they have been shown to help with…
https://queenofthethrones.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/06/Night-and-day-Castor Oil Packs by Queen of the Thrones

2. Balanced inflammation and deep sleep

You see, inflammation is a common cause of pain, bloating, irregular periods, and abnormal vaginal discharge. It’s also a factor in polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS)7, uterine fibroids8, endometriosis9, infertility10, postpartum and menopause.  But, your Pelvic Castor Oil Pack may help support inflammation balance and pain relief throughout all stages of your hormonal life.
Curious to know how this is possible? You see, Castor Oil contains ricinoleic acid, a natural anti-inflammatory11, 12. So, when you pair that with your cozy Pelvic Castor Oil Pack, it’s like a weighted blanket for all your reproductive organs so you can naturally relax and wind down for a deep sleep13 14. You see, just like how an ice pack reduces swelling and inflammation when you have an injury, your Pelvic Castor Oil Pack is your new way to balance the pain you get from inflammation, but without the cold! You can also add an abdominal massage with a Fascia Body Roller to support flow and relaxation when your hormones are causing a raging storm inside your body. Castor Oil Packs can also help you stop dreading your periods by providing you with…

3. Natural period pain support and a regular monthly cycle

Do you struggle with terrible period cramps and ever wonder why they happen? You see, menstrual cramps occur due to contractions of smooth muscles of your uterus working to expel blood.  Did you know that Castor Oil may help by supporting the smooth muscles15 of your digestive tract and uterus?  Why does this matter
Well, have you noticed that you poo more often before and during your period? That’s because the same hormones and messengers stimulate your digestive tract to move and your uterus to expel the blood16. So, by acting on your smooth muscles, Castor Oil Packs may even help with your cramping because it naturally shifts your body and muscles into a state of rest and relaxation. But remember, rest and relaxation take practice, so consistency is key with your Castor Oil Pelvic Pack. Curious how you can use Castor Oil Packs while intentionally following the moon’s phases to support your monthly cycle?
Mother nature moon phases by Queen of the Thrones

So, how do you use your Castor Oil Pack for Pelvis & Hips?

This two-step process is a new and easy way of an old traditional method to support your body from the outside in. Step One: Apply 1 tbsp of Organic Castor Oil to the soft organic cotton flannel side of your Queen of the Thrones® pack Step Two: Place your pack over the pelvic region and tie it in place with the soft, stretchy, adjustable straps.  
How to use your Queen of the Thrones Castor Oil Pack for Pelvis
*Remember: Castor Oil can stain clothing and bed sheets so always wear old clothing with your practice. With consistent use, this self-care tool may help support hormone balance and reproductive health Would you love to know how to do hormonal cycling with the moon and Castor Oil Packs?

Common questions

  1. What if I’m on medications, hormone replacement therapy, birth control pills, IUDs, or supplements? Castor Oil Packs are safely combined with any medication and supplement as there are no known contraindications or interactions with medication. They are likely safe to use with hormone replacements, TTC medicines, birth control pills, and IUDs.   2. Why can’t I just drink Castor Oil or rub it on my skin? Taken orally, Castor Oil is a stimulant laxative that makes you have to poop. ​​Simply rubbing it on your skin and wearing a T-shirt overtop will only gives you about 50% of the benefits. You need a pack for compression to help move your body into the relaxed state where liver detox, lymphatic drainage, and colon cleansing are supported. 3. Can I use an old piece of cloth or an organic bamboo pack? ONLY use organic cotton, wool or linen for your Castor Oil Pack! Other materials like ‘organic’ bamboo are highly processed with chemicals. Old clothing may be made with harsh dyes, bleach, and flame retardants that aren’t ideal to absorb into your body.   4. Isn’t it messy? By nature, Castor Oil is an oil so it will stain clothing and fabrics. This is why we created this LESS-mess pack. No, it’s not entirely messless, but it’s LESS messy than the old way. 5. Do I have to add heat? Queen of the Thrones® Castor Oil Packs are engineered to hold in your body heat naturally, so additional heat is not needed. Know more about how to sync your Castor Oil Pack practice with the moon phases to help support hormonal health in this free infographic  
Balance your hormones with Queen of the Thrones Castor Oil Pack ipad
Are you a practitioner, health coach or wellness influencer? If you’re interested in recommending our easy-to-use tools and practically applying them in your health and wellness professional practice, in clinic, or online with the people you serve, you can join now!
Disclaimer
Disclaimer: Any opinions, advice, statements, services, offers, information or content expressed or made available by third parties, including information providers, are those of the respective authors or distributors. Neither Queen of the Thrones® nor any third-party provider of information guarantees the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any content. This communication does not create a doctor-patient relationship. Information provided does not replace the advice of your health care practitioner. If you happen to purchase anything we promote, in this or any of our communications, it’s likely Queen of the Thrones® will receive some kind of affiliate compensation. Still, we only promote content and products that we truly believe in and share with our friends, family and patients. If you ever have a concern with anything we share, please let us know at care@queenofthethrones.com. We want to make sure we are always serving Our Queendom at the highest level.
Click here for references
 
  1. Francis S, Rolls ET, Bowtell R, McGlone F, O’Doherty J, Browning A, Clare S, Smith E. The representation of pleasant touch in the brain and its relationship with taste and olfactory areas. Neuroreport. 1999 Feb 25;10(3):453-9. PMID: 10208571
  2. Löken LS, Wessberg J, Morrison I, McGlone F, Olausson H. Coding of pleasant touch by unmyelinated afferents in humans. Nat Neurosci. 2009 May;12(5):547-8. Epub 2009 Apr 12. PMID: 19363489
  3. Walker SC1, Trotter PD2, Swaney WT2, Marshall A3, Mcglone FP4. C-tactile afferents: Cutaneous mediators of oxytocin release during affiliative tactile interactions? Neuropeptides. 2017 Aug;64:27-38. doi: 10.1016/j.npep.2017.01.001. Epub 2017 Jan 19. PMID: 28162847
  4. Rolls ET et all. Representations of pleasant and painful touch in the human orbitofrontal and cingulate cortices. Cereb Cortex. 2003 Mar;13(3):308-17. PMID: 12571120
  5. Uvnas-Moberg K1, Petersson M.[Oxytocin, a mediator of anti-stress, well-being, social interaction, growth and healing]. Z Psychosom Med Psychother. 2005;51(1):57-80. PMID: 15834840
  6. Reynolds TA, Makhanova A, Marcinkowska UM, Jasienska G, McNulty JK, Eckel LA, Nikonova L, Maner JK. Progesterone and women’s anxiety across the menstrual cycle. Horm Behav. 2018 Jun;102:34-40. doi: 10.1016/j.yhbeh.2018.04.008. Epub 2018 Apr 24. PMID: 29673619.
  7. Rudnicka E, Suchta K, Grymowicz M, Calik-Ksepka A, Smolarczyk K, Duszewska AM, Smolarczyk R, Meczekalski B. Chronic Low Grade Inflammation in Pathogenesis of PCOS. Int J Mol Sci. 2021 Apr 6;22(7):3789. doi: 10.3390/ijms22073789. PMID: 33917519; PMCID: PMC8038770.
  8. Cetin E, Al-Hendy A, Ciebiera M. Non-hormonal mediators of uterine fibroid growth. Curr Opin Obstet Gynecol. 2020 Oct;32(5):361-370. doi: 10.1097/GCO.0000000000000650. PMID: 32739973; PMCID: PMC8314923.
  9. Jiang L, Yan Y, Liu Z, Wang Y. Inflammation and endometriosis. Front Biosci (Landmark Ed). 2016 Jun 1;21(5):941-8. doi: 10.2741/4431. PMID: 27100482.
  10. Fabozzi G, Verdone G, Allori M, Cimadomo D, Tatone C, Stuppia L, Franzago M, Ubaldi N, Vaiarelli A, Ubaldi FM, Rienzi L, Gennarelli G. Personalized Nutrition in the Management of Female Infertility: New Insights on Chronic Low-Grade Inflammation. Nutrients. 2022 May 3;14(9):1918. doi: 10.3390/nu14091918. PMID: 35565885; PMCID: PMC9105997.
  11. Boddu SH1, Alsaab H2, Umar S3, Bonam SP2, Gupta H2, Ahmed S3. Anti-inflammatory effects of a novel ricinoleic acid poloxamer gel system for transdermal delivery. Int J Pharm. 2015 Feb 1;479(1):207-11. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpharm.2014.12.051. Epub 2014 Dec 24
  12. Vieira C et al. .Effect of ricinoleic acid in acute and subchronic experimental models of inflammation. Mediators Inflamm. 2000;9(5):223-8 PMID: 11200362
  13. Eron K, Kohnert L, Watters A, Logan C, Weisner-Rose M, Mehler PS. Weighted Blanket Use: A Systematic Review. Am J Occup Ther. 2020 Mar/Apr;74(2):7402205010p1-7402205010p14. doi: 10.5014/ajot.2020.037358. PMID: 32204779.
  14. Meth EMS, Brandão LEM, van Egmond LT, Xue P, Grip A, Wu J, Adan A, Andersson F, Pacheco AP, Uvnäs-Moberg K, Cedernaes J, Benedict C. A weighted blanket increases pre-sleep salivary concentrations of melatonin in young, healthy adults. J Sleep Res. 2023 Apr;32(2):e13743. doi: 10.1111/jsr.13743. Epub 2022 Oct 3. PMID: 36184925.
  15. Sorin Tunaru,a Till F. Althoff,a Rolf M. Nüsing,b Martin Diener,c and Stefan Offermannsa,d,1 Castor oil induces laxation and uterus contraction via ricinoleic acid activating prostaglandin EP3 receptors. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2012 Jun 5; 109(23): 9179–9184. Published online 2012 May 21. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1201627109 PMID: 22615395
  16. Camerino C. The New Frontier in Oxytocin Physiology: The Oxytonic Contraction. Int J Mol Sci. 2020 Jul 21;21(14):5144. doi: 10.3390/ijms21145144. PMID: 32708109; PMCID: PMC7404128.
How to Reduce Stress for a Happier Gut

How to Reduce Stress for a Happier Gut

https://queenofthethrones.com/wp-content/uploads/202How to Reduce Stress for a Happier Gut by Queen of The Thrones

How to Reduce Stress for a Happier Gut

Guest  Blog By: Tiffany Cagwin, FDN-P, RYT

Medically reviewd by: Victoria Williams R.H.N.

Est reading time: 8  minutes

Simple Tips to Help Reduce Stress and Support Better Digestion

You’re tired all the time, feeling ragged and run-down, and now you’re beginning to notice some signs that your health is suffering too. Sound familiar?

As a functional health coach, I have seen personally and professionally, how stress symptoms and sleep disorders can negatively affect our health. Knowing how to reduce stress and get deeper sleep is so important for wellbeing. In fact, stress can take a huge toll on gut health in particular. Why?

Well, your gut and brain are interconnected through the gut-brain axis, and stress can really disrupt this connection and lead to various gut-related problems. But there is an ancient tool that can help support deeper sleep and stress: Castor Oil Packs. 

 Let’s first look at . . .

How stress disrupts digestive balance

When you’re experiencing symptoms of stress, your body releases hormones like cortisol and adrenaline. These fight or flight hormones have a direct affect on your digestive system because they cause the muscles in your digestive tract to contract.
And guess what this leads to? 

Cramps, bloating, and diarrhea. On top of these discomforts, stress can also slow down digestion5 which can lead to constipation and a decrease in the beneficial bacteria that helps maintain a healthy microbiome. Plus, digestive discomfort contributes to sleep disorders, and sound sleep is what you need to restore better health. It’s a vicious cycle! 

One significant symptom of stress is inflammation which can cause damage to your intestinal lining – making it more permeable and prone to conditions like leaky gut4. Without some stress relief, the substances that are normally kept safely inside your intestines begin to seep out and slowly enter your bloodstream. Now, the stage is set for the vicious cycle of immune reactions and more inflammation – something you definitely want to avoid, agreed? 

Overall, chronic stress can contribute to a variety of gut problems1, including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and other digestive disorders2,4, and this is just one reason why it’s so important to learn how to reduce stress.

How to reduce stress for gut health

Here’s the thing. Whether it’s work-related, personal relationships, financial worries, or physical health concerns, stress is an unavoidable part of life, but it doesn’t have to be debilitating. 

Reducing stress is the key, and how you choose to do this can make all the difference in your overall health and quality of life. But you’re wondering where to start, right?

Well, here are some stress relief techniques that I often recommend to my clients, and if practiced regularly, can lead to more sound sleep and fewer symptoms of stress.

 

Mindfulness Meditation

Practicing mindfulness meditation may help reduce stress and improve overall well-being3.  

Also, you don’t have to sit for an hour or even a half-hour to benefit from this practice. Mindfulness meditation simply involves paying attention to the present moment without judgment or distraction. It helps to calm your mind and promote a sense of inner peace. Regular practice may even improve sleep quality6, lower blood pressure7,8, and reduce symptoms of stress,  anxiety and depression8

Start small and just try to bring your awareness to the present moment throughout the day, or dedicate just 10 minutes a day to mindfulness meditation, and gradually work your way to longer periods of practice. You can also wear a Medical Mystic Mask when you sit! It can help you center and relax for better presence!

Meditation by Queen of the Thrones

Exercise

Physical activity is a great way to relieve stress, get more sound sleep and improve your overall health9. Exercise releases endorphins, which are natural mood-boosters10. Exercise can also help to reduce muscle tension and promote relaxation11. Aim for at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise each day, such as brisk walking, cycling, or swimming. Ideally, exercise outside so that you are also getting the benefit of the healing power of sunlight.

 

Healthy Diet

The food we eat can have a significant impact on our symptoms of stress. A healthy, balanced diet of whole foods, especially vegetables, hearty protein and healthy fats, may provide some stress relief and improve overall well-being. Try to avoid or limit processed foods, refined sugars, and alcohol13, which can exacerbate symptoms of stress and anxiety12.

Deeper Sleep

Lack of sound sleep can increase stress symptoms and make it more difficult to manage daily challenges. But you might be thinking, “How can I Improve my sleep?” 

Start by aiming for 7-9 hours of sound sleep each night, and create a relaxing bedtime routine to help you unwind for deep sleep. Adding the gentle compression of a Queen of the Thrones® Castor Oil Pack to your bedtime routine may help move your body into the parasympathetic ‘rest and digest’ state14-17, and may support your body in its detox and repair processes.

 

Self-Care

Self-care is essential for managing symptoms of stress and promoting overall health and well-being. Make time for activities that bring you joy, such as reading, listening to music, or spending time outdoors. Set boundaries to protect your time and energy, and prioritize self-care and deep sleep as an essential part of your daily routine.

How Castor Oil Packs may support stress relief and deeper sleep

As you can see, managing symptoms of stress is crucial for promoting overall health and well-being. And if you want to improve your gut health, you must begin by learning to manage your stress in a healthy way. 

By incorporating mindfulness meditation, exercise, a healthy diet, adequate sleep, and self-care into your daily life, you’ll be well on your way to relieving stress and getting deeper sleep.  But there is one self-care tool that I particularly love, because it can support relaxation, deeper sleep, and less stress easily and conveniently: Castor Oil Packs.

The use of Castor Oil dates back thousands of years. In the last 100 years, Castor Oil was poured on a piece of cotton fabric and applied to the body as a Castor Oil Pack. Using Castor Oil this way proved to be pretty messy, but Queen of the Thrones® Castor Oil Packs provide all the benefits with less mess.

Queen of the Thrones Castor Oil Liver Pack for better gut health

How to Use Castor Oil Packs

Step 1: Apply 1 tbsp of organic Castor Oil.

Step 2: Place the pack over your liver area and tie it in place.

Wear for 1 hour daily or overnight.

Here’s how they work: The gentle pressure of the Castor Oil Pack on your body may promote the love and connection hormone, oxytocin19. If you’ve ever felt comforted by a weighted blanket, Castor Oil Packs may help produce a similar feeling. Oxytocin is important for stress relief because it may help support better cortisol20 (the stress hormone) balance.

Ideal for supporting deeper sleep, Castor Oil Packs may help stimulate the pleasure centers of your brain21, 22, 23 and may help support the production of dopamine, a feel-good hormone that helps you feel satisfied. 

One enormous benefit of using Castor Oil Packs is that there are almost no known side-effects associated with them. In short, developing the use of Castor Oil Packs into your wellness routine is a smart choice. You’re providing your body with another opportunity to restore and reset which is always an important part of self-care.

As a functional health coach, I am here to support you on your wellness journey and provide you with the tools and resources you need to thrive. Visit my website to know more about how we can work together. 

About the author:

Tiffany Cagwin, FDN-P, RYT.

Certified Functional Diagnostic Nutrition Practitioner

Board Certified Holistic Health Practitioner 

Website: https://www.tiffanycagwin.com

Are you a practitioner, health coach or wellness influencer? If you’re interested in recommending our easy-to-use tools and practically applying them in your health and wellness professional practice, in clinic, or online with the people you serve, you can join now!
Click here for references
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2. Madison A, Kiecolt-Glaser JK. Stress, depression, diet, and the gut microbiota: human-bacteria interactions at the core of psychoneuroimmunology and nutrition. Curr Opin Behav Sci. 2019 Aug;28:105-110. doi: 10.1016/j.cobeha.2019.01.011. Epub 2019 Mar 25. PMID: 32395568; PMCID: PMC7213601.

3. Goyal M, Singh S, Sibinga EM, Gould NF, Rowland-Seymour A, Sharma R, Berger Z, Sleicher D, Maron DD, Shihab HM, Ranasinghe PD, Linn S, Saha S, Bass EB, Haythornthwaite JA. Meditation programs for psychological stress and well-being: a systematic review and meta-analysis. JAMA Intern Med. 2014 Mar;174(3):357-68. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2013.13018. PMID: 24395196; PMCID: PMC4142584.

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6. Rusch HL, Rosario M, Levison LM, Olivera A, Livingston WS, Wu T, Gill JM. The effect of mindfulness meditation on sleep quality: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2019 Jun;1445(1):5-16. doi: 10.1111/nyas.13996. Epub 2018 Dec 21. PMID: 30575050; PMCID: PMC6557693.

7. Park SH, Han KS. Blood Pressure Response to Meditation and Yoga: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. J Altern Complement Med. 2017 Sep;23(9):685-695. doi: 10.1089/acm.2016.0234. Epub 2017 Apr 6. PMID: 28384004.

8. Bell TP. Meditative Practice Cultivates Mindfulness and Reduces Anxiety, Depression, Blood Pressure, and Heart Rate in a Diverse Sample. J Cogn Psychother. 2015;29(4):343-355. doi: 10.1891/0889-8391.29.4.343. Epub 2015 Jan 1. PMID: 32755943.

9. Schultchen D, Reichenberger J, Mittl T, Weh TRM, Smyth JM, Blechert J, Pollatos O. Bidirectional relationship of stress and affect with physical

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11. Mader T, Chaillou T, Alves ES, Jude B, Cheng AJ, Kenne E, Mijwel S, Kurzejamska E, Vincent CT, Rundqvist H, Lanner JT. Exercise reduces intramuscular stress and counteracts muscle weakness in mice with breast cancer. J Cachexia Sarcopenia Muscle. 2022 Apr;13(2):1151-1163. doi: 10.1002/jcsm.12944. Epub 2022 Feb 15. PMID: 35170227; PMCID: PMC8978016.

12. Coletro HN, Mendonça RD, Meireles AL, Machado-Coelho GLL, Menezes MC. Ultra-processed and fresh food consumption and symptoms of anxiety and depression during the COVID – 19 pandemic: COVID Inconfidentes. Clin Nutr ESPEN. 2022 Feb;47:206-214. doi: 10.1016/j.clnesp.2021.12.013. Epub 2021 Dec 20. PMID: 35063203; PMCID: PMC8710821.

13. Becker HC. Influence of stress associated with chronic alcohol exposure on drinking. Neuropharmacology. 2017 Aug 1;122:115-126. doi: 10.1016/j.neuropharm.2017.04.028. Epub 2017 Apr 19. PMID: 28431971; PMCID: PMC5497303.

14. Walker SC1, Trotter PD2, Swaney WT2, Marshall A3, Mcglone FP4. C-tactile afferents: Cutaneous mediators of oxytocin release during affiliative tactile interactions? Neuropeptides. 2017 Aug;64:27-38. doi: 10.1016/j.npep.2017.01.001. Epub 2017 Jan 19. PMID: 28162847 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/281628471. 5Rolls ET et all. Representations of pleasant and painful touch in the human orbitofrontal and cingulate cortices. Cereb Cortex. 2003 Mar;13(3):308-17. PMID: 12571120 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12571120

15. Francis S, Rolls ET, Bowtell R, McGlone F, O’Doherty J, Browning A, Clare S, Smith E. The representation of pleasant touch in the brain and its relationship with taste and olfactory areas. Neuroreport. 1999 Feb 25;10(3):453-9. PMID: 10208571 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10208571

16. Löken LS, Wessberg J, Morrison I, McGlone F, Olausson H. Coding of pleasant touch by unmyelinated afferents in humans. Nat Neurosci. 2009 May;12(5):547-8. Epub 2009 Apr 12. PMID: 19363489 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19363489

17. Boddu SH1, Alsaab H2, Umar S3, Bonam SP2, Gupta H2, Ahmed S3. Anti-inflammatory effects of a novel ricinoleic acid poloxamer gel system for transdermal delivery. Int J Pharm. 2015 Feb 1;479(1):207-11. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpharm.2014.12.051. Epub 2014 Dec 24. PMID: 25542985

18. Walker SC1, Trotter PD2, Swaney WT2, Marshall A3, Mcglone FP4. C-tactile afferents: Cutaneous mediators of oxytocin release during affiliative tactile interactions? Neuropeptides. 2017 Aug;64:27-38. doi: 10.1016/j.npep.2017.01.001. Epub 2017 Jan 19. PMID: 28162847 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28162847

19. Uvnas-Moberg K1, Petersson M.[Oxytocin, a mediator of anti-stress, well-being, social interaction, growth and healing]. Z Psychosom Med Psychother. 2005;51(1):57-80. PMID: 15834840 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15834840

20. Rolls ET et all. Representations of pleasant and painful touch in the human orbitofrontal and cingulate cortices. Cereb Cortex. 2003 Mar;13(3):308-17. PMID: 12571120 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12571120

21. Francis S, Rolls ET, Bowtell R, McGlone F, O’Doherty J, Browning A, Clare S, Smith E. The representation of pleasant touch in the brain and its relationship with taste and olfactory areas. Neuroreport. 1999 Feb 25;10(3):453-9. PMID: 10208571 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10208571

22. Löken LS, Wessberg J, Morrison I, McGlone F, Olausson H. Coding of pleasant touch by unmyelinated afferents in humans. Nat Neurosci. 2009 May;12(5):547-8. Epub 2009 Apr 12. PMID: 19363489 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19363489 

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