How to Reduce Stress for a Happier Gut

How to Reduce Stress for a Happier Gut

https://queenofthethrones.com/wp-content/uploads/202How to Reduce Stress for a Happier Gut by Queen of The Thrones

How to Reduce Stress for a Happier Gut

Guest  Blog By: Tiffany Cagwin, FDN-P, RYT

Medically reviewd by: Victoria Williams R.H.N.

Est reading time: 8  minutes

Simple Tips to Help Reduce Stress and Support Better Digestion

You’re tired all the time, feeling ragged and run-down, and now you’re beginning to notice some signs that your health is suffering too. Sound familiar?

As a functional health coach, I have seen personally and professionally, how stress symptoms and sleep disorders can negatively affect our health. Knowing how to reduce stress and get deeper sleep is so important for wellbeing. In fact, stress can take a huge toll on gut health in particular. Why?

Well, your gut and brain are interconnected through the gut-brain axis, and stress can really disrupt this connection and lead to various gut-related problems. But there is an ancient tool that can help support deeper sleep and stress: Castor Oil Packs. 

 Let’s first look at . . .

How stress disrupts digestive balance

When you’re experiencing symptoms of stress, your body releases hormones like cortisol and adrenaline. These fight or flight hormones have a direct affect on your digestive system because they cause the muscles in your digestive tract to contract.
And guess what this leads to? 

Cramps, bloating, and diarrhea. On top of these discomforts, stress can also slow down digestion5 which can lead to constipation and a decrease in the beneficial bacteria that helps maintain a healthy microbiome. Plus, digestive discomfort contributes to sleep disorders, and sound sleep is what you need to restore better health. It’s a vicious cycle! 

One significant symptom of stress is inflammation which can cause damage to your intestinal lining – making it more permeable and prone to conditions like leaky gut4. Without some stress relief, the substances that are normally kept safely inside your intestines begin to seep out and slowly enter your bloodstream. Now, the stage is set for the vicious cycle of immune reactions and more inflammation – something you definitely want to avoid, agreed? 

Overall, chronic stress can contribute to a variety of gut problems1, including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and other digestive disorders2,4, and this is just one reason why it’s so important to learn how to reduce stress.

How to reduce stress for gut health

Here’s the thing. Whether it’s work-related, personal relationships, financial worries, or physical health concerns, stress is an unavoidable part of life, but it doesn’t have to be debilitating. 

Reducing stress is the key, and how you choose to do this can make all the difference in your overall health and quality of life. But you’re wondering where to start, right?

Well, here are some stress relief techniques that I often recommend to my clients, and if practiced regularly, can lead to more sound sleep and fewer symptoms of stress.

 

Mindfulness Meditation

Practicing mindfulness meditation may help reduce stress and improve overall well-being3.  

Also, you don’t have to sit for an hour or even a half-hour to benefit from this practice. Mindfulness meditation simply involves paying attention to the present moment without judgment or distraction. It helps to calm your mind and promote a sense of inner peace. Regular practice may even improve sleep quality6, lower blood pressure7,8, and reduce symptoms of stress,  anxiety and depression8

Start small and just try to bring your awareness to the present moment throughout the day, or dedicate just 10 minutes a day to mindfulness meditation, and gradually work your way to longer periods of practice. You can also wear a Medical Mystic Mask when you sit! It can help you center and relax for better presence!

Meditation by Queen of the Thrones

Exercise

Physical activity is a great way to relieve stress, get more sound sleep and improve your overall health9. Exercise releases endorphins, which are natural mood-boosters10. Exercise can also help to reduce muscle tension and promote relaxation11. Aim for at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise each day, such as brisk walking, cycling, or swimming. Ideally, exercise outside so that you are also getting the benefit of the healing power of sunlight.

 

Healthy Diet

The food we eat can have a significant impact on our symptoms of stress. A healthy, balanced diet of whole foods, especially vegetables, hearty protein and healthy fats, may provide some stress relief and improve overall well-being. Try to avoid or limit processed foods, refined sugars, and alcohol13, which can exacerbate symptoms of stress and anxiety12.

Deeper Sleep

Lack of sound sleep can increase stress symptoms and make it more difficult to manage daily challenges. But you might be thinking, “How can I Improve my sleep?” 

Start by aiming for 7-9 hours of sound sleep each night, and create a relaxing bedtime routine to help you unwind for deep sleep. Adding the gentle compression of a Queen of the Thrones® Castor Oil Pack to your bedtime routine may help move your body into the parasympathetic ‘rest and digest’ state14-17, and may support your body in its detox and repair processes.

 

Self-Care

Self-care is essential for managing symptoms of stress and promoting overall health and well-being. Make time for activities that bring you joy, such as reading, listening to music, or spending time outdoors. Set boundaries to protect your time and energy, and prioritize self-care and deep sleep as an essential part of your daily routine.

How Castor Oil Packs may support stress relief and deeper sleep

As you can see, managing symptoms of stress is crucial for promoting overall health and well-being. And if you want to improve your gut health, you must begin by learning to manage your stress in a healthy way. 

By incorporating mindfulness meditation, exercise, a healthy diet, adequate sleep, and self-care into your daily life, you’ll be well on your way to relieving stress and getting deeper sleep.  But there is one self-care tool that I particularly love, because it can support relaxation, deeper sleep, and less stress easily and conveniently: Castor Oil Packs.

The use of Castor Oil dates back thousands of years. In the last 100 years, Castor Oil was poured on a piece of cotton fabric and applied to the body as a Castor Oil Pack. Using Castor Oil this way proved to be pretty messy, but Queen of the Thrones® Castor Oil Packs provide all the benefits with less mess.

Queen of the Thrones Castor Oil Liver Pack for better gut health

How to Use Castor Oil Packs

Step 1: Apply 1 tbsp of organic Castor Oil.

Step 2: Place the pack over your liver area and tie it in place.

Wear for 1 hour daily or overnight.

Here’s how they work: The gentle pressure of the Castor Oil Pack on your body may promote the love and connection hormone, oxytocin19. If you’ve ever felt comforted by a weighted blanket, Castor Oil Packs may help produce a similar feeling. Oxytocin is important for stress relief because it may help support better cortisol20 (the stress hormone) balance.

Ideal for supporting deeper sleep, Castor Oil Packs may help stimulate the pleasure centers of your brain21, 22, 23 and may help support the production of dopamine, a feel-good hormone that helps you feel satisfied. 

One enormous benefit of using Castor Oil Packs is that there are almost no known side-effects associated with them. In short, developing the use of Castor Oil Packs into your wellness routine is a smart choice. You’re providing your body with another opportunity to restore and reset which is always an important part of self-care.

As a functional health coach, I am here to support you on your wellness journey and provide you with the tools and resources you need to thrive. Visit my website to know more about how we can work together. 

About the author:

Tiffany Cagwin, FDN-P, RYT.

Certified Functional Diagnostic Nutrition Practitioner

Board Certified Holistic Health Practitioner 

Website: https://www.tiffanycagwin.com

Are you a practitioner, health coach or wellness influencer? If you’re interested in recommending our easy-to-use tools and practically applying them in your health and wellness professional practice, in clinic, or online with the people you serve, you can join now!
Click here for references
1. Cherpak CE. Mindful Eating: A Review Of How The Stress-Digestion-Mindfulness Triad May Modulate And Improve Gastrointestinal And Digestive Function. Integr Med (Encinitas). 2019 Aug;18(4):48-53. PMID: 32549835; PMCID: PMC7219460.

2. Madison A, Kiecolt-Glaser JK. Stress, depression, diet, and the gut microbiota: human-bacteria interactions at the core of psychoneuroimmunology and nutrition. Curr Opin Behav Sci. 2019 Aug;28:105-110. doi: 10.1016/j.cobeha.2019.01.011. Epub 2019 Mar 25. PMID: 32395568; PMCID: PMC7213601.

3. Goyal M, Singh S, Sibinga EM, Gould NF, Rowland-Seymour A, Sharma R, Berger Z, Sleicher D, Maron DD, Shihab HM, Ranasinghe PD, Linn S, Saha S, Bass EB, Haythornthwaite JA. Meditation programs for psychological stress and well-being: a systematic review and meta-analysis. JAMA Intern Med. 2014 Mar;174(3):357-68. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2013.13018. PMID: 24395196; PMCID: PMC4142584.

4. Bhatia V, Tandon RK. Stress and the gastrointestinal tract. J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2005 Mar;20(3):332-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1440-1746.2004.03508.x. PMID: 15740474.

5. Chang YM, El-Zaatari M, Kao JY. Does stress induce bowel dysfunction? Expert Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2014 Aug;8(6):583-5. doi: 10.1586/17474124.2014.911659. Epub 2014 May 31. PMID: 24881644; PMCID: PMC4249634.

6. Rusch HL, Rosario M, Levison LM, Olivera A, Livingston WS, Wu T, Gill JM. The effect of mindfulness meditation on sleep quality: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2019 Jun;1445(1):5-16. doi: 10.1111/nyas.13996. Epub 2018 Dec 21. PMID: 30575050; PMCID: PMC6557693.

7. Park SH, Han KS. Blood Pressure Response to Meditation and Yoga: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. J Altern Complement Med. 2017 Sep;23(9):685-695. doi: 10.1089/acm.2016.0234. Epub 2017 Apr 6. PMID: 28384004.

8. Bell TP. Meditative Practice Cultivates Mindfulness and Reduces Anxiety, Depression, Blood Pressure, and Heart Rate in a Diverse Sample. J Cogn Psychother. 2015;29(4):343-355. doi: 10.1891/0889-8391.29.4.343. Epub 2015 Jan 1. PMID: 32755943.

9. Schultchen D, Reichenberger J, Mittl T, Weh TRM, Smyth JM, Blechert J, Pollatos O. Bidirectional relationship of stress and affect with physical

10. Harber VJ, Sutton JR. Endorphins and exercise. Sports Med. 1984 Mar-Apr;1(2):154-71. doi: 10.2165/00007256-198401020-00004. PMID: 6091217.activity and healthy eating. Br J Health Psychol. 2019 May;24(2):315-333. doi: 10.1111/bjhp.12355. Epub 2019 Jan 22. PMID: 30672069; PMCID: PMC6767465.

11. Mader T, Chaillou T, Alves ES, Jude B, Cheng AJ, Kenne E, Mijwel S, Kurzejamska E, Vincent CT, Rundqvist H, Lanner JT. Exercise reduces intramuscular stress and counteracts muscle weakness in mice with breast cancer. J Cachexia Sarcopenia Muscle. 2022 Apr;13(2):1151-1163. doi: 10.1002/jcsm.12944. Epub 2022 Feb 15. PMID: 35170227; PMCID: PMC8978016.

12. Coletro HN, Mendonça RD, Meireles AL, Machado-Coelho GLL, Menezes MC. Ultra-processed and fresh food consumption and symptoms of anxiety and depression during the COVID – 19 pandemic: COVID Inconfidentes. Clin Nutr ESPEN. 2022 Feb;47:206-214. doi: 10.1016/j.clnesp.2021.12.013. Epub 2021 Dec 20. PMID: 35063203; PMCID: PMC8710821.

13. Becker HC. Influence of stress associated with chronic alcohol exposure on drinking. Neuropharmacology. 2017 Aug 1;122:115-126. doi: 10.1016/j.neuropharm.2017.04.028. Epub 2017 Apr 19. PMID: 28431971; PMCID: PMC5497303.

14. Walker SC1, Trotter PD2, Swaney WT2, Marshall A3, Mcglone FP4. C-tactile afferents: Cutaneous mediators of oxytocin release during affiliative tactile interactions? Neuropeptides. 2017 Aug;64:27-38. doi: 10.1016/j.npep.2017.01.001. Epub 2017 Jan 19. PMID: 28162847 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/281628471. 5Rolls ET et all. Representations of pleasant and painful touch in the human orbitofrontal and cingulate cortices. Cereb Cortex. 2003 Mar;13(3):308-17. PMID: 12571120 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12571120

15. Francis S, Rolls ET, Bowtell R, McGlone F, O’Doherty J, Browning A, Clare S, Smith E. The representation of pleasant touch in the brain and its relationship with taste and olfactory areas. Neuroreport. 1999 Feb 25;10(3):453-9. PMID: 10208571 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10208571

16. Löken LS, Wessberg J, Morrison I, McGlone F, Olausson H. Coding of pleasant touch by unmyelinated afferents in humans. Nat Neurosci. 2009 May;12(5):547-8. Epub 2009 Apr 12. PMID: 19363489 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19363489

17. Boddu SH1, Alsaab H2, Umar S3, Bonam SP2, Gupta H2, Ahmed S3. Anti-inflammatory effects of a novel ricinoleic acid poloxamer gel system for transdermal delivery. Int J Pharm. 2015 Feb 1;479(1):207-11. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpharm.2014.12.051. Epub 2014 Dec 24. PMID: 25542985

18. Walker SC1, Trotter PD2, Swaney WT2, Marshall A3, Mcglone FP4. C-tactile afferents: Cutaneous mediators of oxytocin release during affiliative tactile interactions? Neuropeptides. 2017 Aug;64:27-38. doi: 10.1016/j.npep.2017.01.001. Epub 2017 Jan 19. PMID: 28162847 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28162847

19. Uvnas-Moberg K1, Petersson M.[Oxytocin, a mediator of anti-stress, well-being, social interaction, growth and healing]. Z Psychosom Med Psychother. 2005;51(1):57-80. PMID: 15834840 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15834840

20. Rolls ET et all. Representations of pleasant and painful touch in the human orbitofrontal and cingulate cortices. Cereb Cortex. 2003 Mar;13(3):308-17. PMID: 12571120 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12571120

21. Francis S, Rolls ET, Bowtell R, McGlone F, O’Doherty J, Browning A, Clare S, Smith E. The representation of pleasant touch in the brain and its relationship with taste and olfactory areas. Neuroreport. 1999 Feb 25;10(3):453-9. PMID: 10208571 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10208571

22. Löken LS, Wessberg J, Morrison I, McGlone F, Olausson H. Coding of pleasant touch by unmyelinated afferents in humans. Nat Neurosci. 2009 May;12(5):547-8. Epub 2009 Apr 12. PMID: 19363489 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19363489 

Disclaimer
Disclaimer: Any opinions, advice, statements, services, offers, information or content expressed or made available by third parties, including information providers, are those of the respective authors or distributors. Neither Queen of the Thrones® nor any third-party provider of information guarantees the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any content. This communication does not create a doctor-patient relationship. Information provided does not replace the advice of your health care practitioner. If you happen to purchase anything we promote, in this or any of our communications, it’s likely Queen of the Thrones® will receive some kind of affiliate compensation. Still, we only promote content and products that we truly believe in and share with our friends, family and patients. If you ever have a concern with anything we share, please let us know at care@queenofthethrones.com. We want to make sure we are always serving Our Queendom at the highest level.

3 Home Remedies for Fever this Cold and Flu Season

3 Home Remedies for Fever this Cold and Flu Season

3 Home Remedies for Fever this Cold and Flu Season by Queen of the Thrones

3 Home Remedies for Fever this Cold and Flu Season

Written by: Victoria Williams R.H.N. Victoria Williams Director of Operations at Queen of the Thrones Victoria Williams R.H.N.
Victoria is Head of Operations at Queen of the Thrones®. Victoria obtained a Pre-Health Science Certificate with Honours from Georgian College, which ignited her passion for natural wellness and nutrition.
Full bio

Medically reviewed by: Melanie Swackhammer B.A. 

Est. reading time: 7 minutes.

How Castor Oil Packs for Kids Can Help

It’s that time of the year again when your child will at some point pick up a seasonal cold because that’s just what kids do, agreed?And sometimes, their little immune systems are really put to the test and those colds are accompanied by a fever.So, you run to the store for your go-to fever remedy, just to find that the shelves are empty due to supply and demand. Can you relate?As a result, you are left to feel stressed and frustrated, am I right?Well, there’s no reason to be stressed, because here you’ll discover three tried and true home remedies for fever used by natural practitioners.As you may have guessed, one of the natural tools to support a fever is a Castor Oil Pack. A study shows that Castor Oil Packs may also help to support immunomodulation1. Sounds good, agreed?

Keep reading so you can know the 3 ancient tried and true fever remedies used by natural practitioners to support your child’s fever naturally. You’ll also learn how Castor Oil Packs can help your child…

Queen of the Thrones Castor Oil Packs improves your Parasympathetic tone

But first, can a fever be dangerous?

Fevers are a common symptom of illness and the immune response and are defined when one’s body temperature reaches 37.5 °C (99.5°F)2. Many natural wellness practitioners would agree that it’s generally not necessary to bring a fever down unless it’s causing discomfort. Studies have shown that fevers are rarely harmful, but, temperatures higher than 41°C (105.8°F) can be dangerous (although, rare)3.

Three tried and true home remedies for a fever

These natural remedies may not only help with fever, but also support your child’s immune system. Let’s have a look at these remedies and how they work. Shall we?

1. Wet, Cold Socks

Much like the Castor Oil Pack, this method is thought to increase circulation and enhance the immune system.

The method goes as follows: After a warm bath, put on a thin pair of cotton socks that have been soaked in ice water (and have been generously rung out), then cover with a second pair of dry wool socks – Q for Quinn makes excellent merino wool socks for toddlers.

During a fever, your child can wear the socks overnight and in the morning the socks will be dry. If your child sweats overnight, be sure to change their pj’s, but keep the socks on.

You can use this remedy alone or combine it with…

2. Cold Baths and Hydrotherapy:

This method is thought to reduce and maintain a fever at a lower temperature, which is still beneficial when they’re sick and fighting infection.

Lukewarm (not ice-cold) sponging or baths may help cool your child’s body and bring down their fever by enhancing circulation and reducing inflammation.

Soak a hand towel in water and be sure to give it a good wring-out so it’s not dripping. Pat down your child’s body from head to feet. This method can be repeated multiple times.

And the last natural remedy…

3. Castor Oil Packs on the Liver:

Castor Oil Packs help to improve your body’s natural ability to support liver detoxification

Wondering how Castor Oil Packs may support a fever?

Well, Castor Oil Packs can help to improve your body’s natural ability to support liver detoxification (toxin and pathogens), lymphatic drainage45 (circulation) and colon cleansing67 (removal), which are key factors for maintaining body temperature.

Here’s how to use it:

Your kid’s Castor Oil Pack practice can be done in 1 hour intervals during acute times of discomfort. Wear the pack for an hour, remove for an hour, then repeat. This practice can be done in combination with the cold sock method and between taking cool baths.

The pack feels like a comforting warm hug for your child while relaxing their little body8-9-10-11, getting them ready for an amazingly deep, restful sleep. Afterall, sleep and rest are vital for recovery from a fever. Plus,  a Castor Oil Pack works from the outside-in to set the foundation for excellent gut health, which reflects in better bowel movements,6-7 balanced microbiome,12-13-14 a sense of calm and overall wellness. Sounds amazing, agreed? Would you love to stock up on your Queen of the Thrones® Castor Oil Pack for Kids now?

Finally, always remember to stay hydrated. Dehydration can make a fever worse, so it’s important to encourage your child to drink plenty of fluids. Tea, water and broth are excellent options. 

It’s important to consult with a healthcare professional if your child’s fever is persistent or if your child is experiencing other symptoms, such as difficulty breathing or severe pain.

Click here for references

References:

  1. Grady H. Immunomodulation through castor oil packs. The Journal of Naturopathic Medicine. Volume 7 Jan 1 1998; 7(1): 84-9 Corpus ID: 52838898

2.. Green R, Webb D, Jeena PM, Wells M, Butt N, Hangoma JM, Moodley RS, Maimin J, Wibbelink M, Mustafa F. Management of acute fever in children: Consensus recommendations for community and primary healthcare providers in sub-Saharan Africa. Afr J Emerg Med. 2021 Jun;11(2):283-296. doi: 10.1016/j.afjem.2020.11.004. Epub 2021 Apr 10. PMID: 33912381; PMCID: PMC8063696.

3.. InformedHealth.org [Internet]. Cologne, Germany: Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG); 2006-. Fever in children: Overview. 2013 Dec 18 [Updated 2019 Jun 6].

4. Moore JE Jr, Bertram CD. Lymphatic System Flows. Annu Rev Fluid Mech. 2018 Jan;50:459-482. doi: 10.1146/annurev-fluid-122316-045259. PMID: 29713107; PMCID: PMC5922450.

5. Holmes GM, Browning KN, Babic T, Fortna SR, Coleman FH, Travagli RA. Vagal afferent fibres determine the oxytocin-induced modulation of gastric tone. J Physiol. 2013 Jun 15;591(12):3081-100. doi: 10.1113/jphysiol.2013.253732. Epub 2013 Apr 15. PMID: 23587885; PMCID: PMC3832121.

6. Arslan GG, Eşer I. An examination of the effect of castor oil packs on constipation in the elderly. Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2011 Feb;17(1):58-62. doi: 10.1016/j.ctcp.2010.04.004. Epub 2010 May 18. PMID: 21168117

7. Sorin Tunaru,a Till F. Althoff,a Rolf M. Nüsing,b Martin Diener,c and Stefan Offermannsa,d,1 Castor oil induces laxation and uterus contraction via ricinoleic acid activating prostaglandin EP3 receptors. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2012 Jun 5; 109(23): 9179–9184. Published online 2012 May 21. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1201627109 PMID: 22615395

8. Walker SC1, Trotter PD2, Swaney WT2, Marshall A3, Mcglone FP4. C-tactile afferents: Cutaneous mediators of oxytocin release during affiliative tactile interactions? Neuropeptides. 2017 Aug;64:27-38. doi: 10.1016/j.npep.2017.01.001. Epub 2017 Jan 19. PMID: 28162847

9. Rolls ET et all. Representations of pleasant and painful touch in the human orbitofrontal and cingulate cortices. Cereb Cortex. 2003 Mar;13(3):308-17. PMID: 12571120

10. Francis S, Rolls ET, Bowtell R, McGlone F, O’Doherty J, Browning A, Clare S, Smith E. The representation of pleasant touch in the brain and its relationship with taste and olfactory areas. Neuroreport. 1999 Feb 25;10(3):453-9. PMID: 10208571

11. Löken LS, Wessberg J, Morrison I, McGlone F, Olausson H. Coding of pleasant touch by unmyelinated afferents in humans. Nat Neurosci. 2009 May;12(5):547-8. Epub 2009 Apr 12. PMID: 19363489

12. Andrade IM1, Andrade KM2, Pisani MX1, Silva-Lovato CH1, de Souza RF1, Paranhos Hde F1.Trial of an experimental castor oil solution for cleaning dentures. Braz Dent J. 2014 Jan-Feb;25(1):43-7.PMID: 24789291

13. Badaró MM, Salles MM, Leite VMF, Arruda CNF, Oliveira VC, Nascimento CD, Souza RF, Paranhos HFO, Silva-Lovato CH. Clinical trial for evaluation of Ricinus communis and sodium hypochlorite as denture cleanser.J Appl Oral Sci. 2017 May-Jun; 25(3):324-334. PMID: 28678952

14. Marcela Moreira Salles, Maurício Malheiros Badaró, Carolina Noronha Ferraz de Arruda, Vanessa Maria Fagundes Leite, Cláudia Helena Lovato da Silva, Evandro Watanabe, Viviane de Cássia Oliveira, Helena de Freitas Oliveira Paranhos, Antimicrobial activity of complete denture cleanser solutions based on sodium hypochlorite and Ricinus communis – a randomized clinical study. Randomized Controlled Trial J Appl Oral Sci Nov-Dec 2015;23(6):637-42. doi: 10.1590/1678-775720150204. PMID: 26814466

Disclaimer

Disclaimer: Any opinions, advice, statements, services, offers, information or content expressed or made available by third parties, including information providers, are those of the respective authors or distributors. Neither Queen of the Thrones® nor any third-party provider of information guarantees the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any content. This communication does not create a doctor-patient relationship. Information provided does not replace the advice of your health care practitioner. If you happen to purchase anything we promote, in this or any of our communications, it’s likely Queen of the Thrones® will receive some kind of affiliate compensation. Still, we only promote content and products that we truly believe in and share with our friends, family and patients. If you ever have a concern with anything we share, please let us know at care@queenofthethrones.com. We want to make sure we are always serving Our Queendom at the highest level.

How to know if you’re sensitive to gluten or dairy?

How to know if you’re sensitive to gluten or dairy?

Gluten and dairy sensibilities by Queen of the Thrones

How to know if you’re sensitive to gluten or dairy?

Written by: Victoria Williams R.H.N. Victoria Williams Director of Operations at Queen of the Thrones Victoria Williams R.H.N.
Victoria is Head of Operations at Queen of the Thrones®. Victoria obtained a Pre-Health Science Certificate with Honours from Georgian College, which ignited her passion for natural wellness and nutrition.
Full bio

Medically reviewed by: Melanie Swackhammer B.A. 

Est. reading time: 7 minutes.

The clue to having gut glue

Having frequent digestive problems means not knowing when it will strike. During an important work presentation, a first date, or at the movies. Can you relate?

You’re at the mercy of loose stools, constipation, painful gas or bloating. And these symptoms might especially come after specific food items, unfortunately, many of which are your favorite, including pizza, fettuccine alfredo, or grilled cheese. This may make you wonder if gluten and dairy are the cause of your stomach problems?

Well, it might not be that one or the other is causing problems. It’s more so the combination of gluten with dairy.

You see, studies have shown that poor food combining can produce fermentation, indigestion, putrefaction, gas and bloating! 1

Like consuming dairy with wheat, this combination could create, what I like to call, “gut glue”! Yes, you read that right… gut GLUE!

Frequent consumption of these food combinations may result in exhausting and frustrating problems.

The good news: knowing what to have or avoid can allow you to feel fresh and be healthy even after consuming your favorite food items.

While you’re here, would you love to know how you can use Castor Oil Packs to support your gut health, and ease digestive problems?

Before we talk about gut glue, I would love to discuss a bit about gluten and dairy on their own.

What is Gluten?

Gluten is a protein commonly found in barley, wheat, and rye.

If you have tried gluten-free cookies, you know they are typically drier and crumble easily.

This is because gluten protein provides the elasticity associated with pasta and baked products.

And these gluten-free products are becoming increasingly popular, as the media has made many believe that this protein is bad for your health. Sound familiar?

But before getting on the gluten-free bandwagon, let’s understand whether it’s really all bad.

Gluten isn’t all bad

Frankly, what thoughts come to your mind when you think about gluten?

For most, it is sticky bowels or bloating, agreed?

However, it’s essential to understand that humans have been consuming gluten as long as the discovery of bread. It’s a great source of soluble fiber, protein, and other nutrients.

 

 

Let’s get scienc-y for a minute.

Your digestive system produces the enzyme protease, which breaks down proteins. But this enzyme can’t entirely break down gluten, and undigested gluten moves through your bowels.

Most people can manage undigested gluten.

So, the nutrients from gluten are beneficial for those who can tolerate it.

Studies have linked consumption of whole grains to lower risk of stroke, heart disease, and type 2 diabetes. The participants of the study daily consumed two to three servings of grains daily, including wheat.2

Moreover, gluten also acts as a prebiotic, supporting the growth of “good” bacteria in your body. It can also help imbalance of bad and good bacteria associated with gut dysbiosis.

What about dairy?

Eating dairy products is the easiest way to get vitamin D, calcium, and proteins needed for the healthy heart, bones, and muscles.

It helps maintain bone density and reduces the risk of fractures.

Studies have even suggested that the right kind of dairy may prevent heart disease.3

So, why is there so much discussion about dairy-free foods?

Well, similar to gluten, your digestive system releases the enzyme lactase to digest sugar in dairy products called lactose.

If you have a problem producing lactase, you probably have symptoms of lactose intolerance, including stomach pain, diarrhea, bloating, and nausea. Makes sense, agreed?

Moreover, evidence suggests that dairy products may improve body composition by reducing waist circumference and fat composition.4

A review of 25 studies also found that various types of yogurt were linked to the lower risk of metabolic syndrome risk factors, such as obesity, high blood pressure, and type 2 diabetes.5

With this in mind, let’s understand more about gut glue.

What about dairy?

My best and favorite example of this is how glue is made.

White school glue, if you didn’t know, is actually edible. You can essentially make it at home with milk, flour, and baking soda, and then the ingredient that is the pièce de résistance is vinegar.

This combination is basically what happens in your belly, when you combine bread (flour) with cheese (dairy/milk) and you swallow it down into your stomach that contains your stomach acid (like vinegar, because it’s acidic!) and bicarbonate (like baking soda).6

Guess what, you’ve got glue in your belly!

So imagine what your gut is like, if you are consuming glue.

Let’s talk anatomy for a second. Ready?

Your small intestine is lined by finger-like projections called villi, that help you absorb nutrients from your food.

Gut glue could cause these projections to get stuck together and reduce your ability to properly digest your food!

In addition, because the carbohydrates and protein don’t digest well together, you get this glue moving all along your digestive tract.

All in all, it’s rarely only one thing that is causing discomfort. It is often multifactorial and there are many contributing factors and culprits.

 

This is simply an example where combining gluten and dairy together may not be ideal for digestion (they also happen to be some of the most common food sensitivities and allergies that people deal with).

This is not it.

According to the traditional Ayurveda medicine, excessive amounts of proteins, carbohydrates and fats should not be taken together as this leads to a feeling of heaviness in the stomach.7

Plus, milk is considered as a complete food.

It contains antioxidants, vitamins, minerals, proteins, good fats, amino acids, calcium, vitamin D, magnesium, lactose, and all nutrients necessary for a healthy body.

That is why in Ayurveda it has been advised not to take wheat products with milk.

What can you do about your digestion problems?

When we choose nourishing food combinations, time our meals accordingly, and create healthy habits like proper chewing, we reduce the chances of these uncomfortable, and sometimes painful symptoms.

Plus, adding the practice of Queen of the Thrones® Castor Oil Packs after your meal may further help with inflammation regulation and help to improve liver detoxification, lymphatic drainage and colon cleansing, which means less digestive problems. Amazing, right?

Would you love to know how Castor Oil Packs work and how they can support your gut health?

Are you a practitioner, health coach or wellness influencer? If you’re interested in recommending our easy-to-use tools and practically applying them in your health and wellness professional practice, in clinic, or online with the people you serve, you can join now!

Click here for references

1. Cömert ED, Gökmen V. Effect of food combinations and their co-digestion on total antioxidant capacity under simulated gastrointestinal conditions. Curr Res Food Sci. 2022 Feb 17;5:414-422. doi: 10.1016/j.crfs.2022.02.008. PMID: 35243354; PMCID: PMC8866489.

2. Ye EQ, Chacko SA, Chou EL, Kugizaki M, Liu S. Greater whole-grain intake is associated with lower risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and weight gain. J Nutr. 2012 Jul;142(7):1304-13. doi: 10.3945/jn.111.155325. Epub 2012 May 30. Erratum in: J Nutr. 2013 Sep;143(9):1524. PMID: 22649266; PMCID: PMC6498460.

3. Lordan R, Tsoupras A, Mitra B, Zabetakis I. Dairy Fats and Cardiovascular Disease: Do We Really Need to be Concerned? Foods. 2018 Mar 1;7(3):29. doi: 10.3390/foods7030029. PMID: 29494487; PMCID: PMC5867544.

4. Abargouei AS, Janghorbani M, Salehi-Marzijarani M, Esmaillzadeh A. Effect of dairy consumption on weight and body composition in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials. Int J Obes (Lond). 2012 Dec;36(12):1485-93. doi: 10.1038/ijo.2011.269. Epub 2012 Jan 17. PMID: 22249225.

5. Khorraminezhad L, Rudkowska I. Effect of Yogurt Consumption on Metabolic Syndrome Risk Factors: a Narrative Review. Curr Nutr Rep. 2021 Mar;10(1):83-92. doi: 10.1007/s13668-020-00344-y. Epub 2021 Jan 6. PMID: 33405074.

6. G. Lynn Carlson. A New approach to the baking soda-vinegar reaction. J. Chem. Educ., 1990, 67 (7), p 597 DOI: 10.1021/ed067p597. Publication Date: July 1990

7. Sabnis M. Viruddha Ahara: A critical view. Ayu. 2012 Jul;33(3):332-6. doi: 10.4103/0974-8520.108817. PMID: 23723637; PMCID: PMC3665091.